Photographed BILLIE SHAKER
Hair MARCOS DIAZ
Makeup KELLY BUDD

In the over saturated world of styling it’s hard to make a noticeable impression. Nevertheless, native New Yorker Nicole Vitagliano is doing just that, and is quickly becoming one of New York’s most sought after stylist and consultants. It’s her down to earth and humorous personality that brings a breath of fresh air to this sometimes-stagnant niche. In an almost effortless manner, Vitagliano cohesively unites seduction and intimacy without coming off raunchy, which is best illustrated in her work with Bambini, Dazed & Confused, French Playboy, Karen Walker and more.

Vitagliano embarked on a journey that would later become her career in Italy, studying with the Ferragamo Group. Once stateside, she hit the ground running working under the Fashion Director of BlackBook. In 2008, Vitagliano styled America Ferrera for the cover of the magazine, shot by prominent fashion photographer Eric Ogden. Since then she has styled covers not only for Lurve, but also Playing Fashion and Smug Magazines. Over the years she has complied an expansive clientele consisting of A-list celebrities, models, musicians and downtown legends, which has enabled Vitagliano to manifest creatively, showcasing her unapologetic chemistry for both refinement and the eccentric. It was this chemistry which made Vitagliano the ideal stylist for the F/W 10 lookbook and S/S 11 advertising campaign and runway show for Cushnie et Ochs. Adjoining her already unique and extensive portfolio, a new facet in Nicole’s career is now underway with The Starworks Artists, a division of the Starworks Group, now representing her.So, whether she’s styling a child for Bambini, Daisy Lowe or songstress America Ferrera, Nicole Vitagliano is proving to be the new renaissance gal of her field. She lets her work speak for itself while remaining optimistic of what the future has to offer. Nicole is currently back in New York and took some time out to talk to us about how her journey first began, some of her favorite moments along the way, and of course, style. — Andrew Sulzer


 

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